Become a writer – transform your inspiration into words.


Transforming inspiration, Writing aspirations, grab readers attention, writing, structure your story, keep it simple, Writing POV

Ways to transform your inspiration into words – Part 2

Many times I’ve met people who express their wish to become a writer, but they haven’t been able to transition into taking their writing passion seriously due to other pressing exigencies, thus their wish to write keeps taking the back burner.

Important lessons that I’ve learned about writing is – that there will never be the right time to get started because life keeps happening and secondly, you have to treat your writing like a job; whether it’s started paying or not.

Your writing is not something done in a haphazard way if you truly want to make some meaning out of it.

I suggest that you take a look at Part 1 of this series on how to become a writer to help you merge both series.

Write what you know about

When you are familiar with something or a topic, it’s far easier to write about it in more depth and details. The realism of your story shows in your words and ultimately translates to a better read. There might be times that you want to dabble into a not so well-known topic, you would need to do enough research to comfortably express your thoughts.

Grab your reader’s attention

Help your readers to see through your eyes right from the beginning because a readers’ minds could be very selective. You’ve got to give them a reason to pay attention to what you are saying. To do this, there are some techniques that you could use:

  1. Start with an opening that arouses curiosity to know more.
  2. Use the emotional and sensory approach. Our experiences and perception of things are through our senses and your words should draw on the sense of visual, hearing, smelling, tasting, touching and emotions which will often compel your readers’ own imagination as they vicariously experience what you are writing.
  3. Add concrete details that would help to give a sense of understanding of what is happening in the writing. Instead of using generalist terms to describe an image – a man in a white shirt, be more specific – the tall man in a white shirt with a limp in his steps.

Structure your story

Sometimes achieving the natural progression of your story by writing chapter after chapter in a linear structure of beginning, middle and end, may not be as easy to do as we would like, but you could take up your story from its climax – if that comes easier – and then backtrack to flesh it out as you go on.

Choose a point of view

The point of view you decide to use is largely dependent on the information that you seek to communicate. There are various POV’s that could be used in writing. Let’s take a brief look at them.

  1. The First person POV could be used when your main character is telling the story. Here you use an ‘I’ narrator and your readers’ experience of the story is through the eyes of the narrator. The first person POV could equally be in the plural form ‘we’ when there’s a collective number of narrators. The first person POV could be a detached narrator who might be a supporting character in the story.
  2. The Second person POV. This is most often used for instructional writing which it told from the perspective of ‘you.’
  3. The Third person POV is the most commonly used point of view in writing. The third person uses ‘he/she or it’ narrator and your narrator is not a character in the story.  The third person POV has three main types:

The third person limited POV which limits the point of view to one character. The narrator is only privy to what the character knows, therefore the vision would get smaller and limited.

The third person multiple. Here the narrator can follow multiple characters in the story by using he/she/it, but the onus lies on you to make sure that your reader knows when you are switching from one character to the next one.

The third person omniscient. This point of view offers the narrator a free rein in the story where the narrator knows everything and is not limited by what one character knows. Your narrator in this point of view could even know things that others are not aware of.

Keep it Simple

Starting with simple sentences is the best approach. Yes, your vocabulary might be extensive and you love to toss those fancy words into the mix, the usage of bogus words right from the onset throws readers off-balance. Your need to give every reader who comes across your writing an opportunity to understand and appreciate the information.

Thank you for visiting The Art of Beautiful Expressions. We do hope to see more of you.

 

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I am Jacqueline Oby-Ikocha. A freelance writer, author and serial blogger. I am a passionate life enthusiast, a peoples' person who loves to read, write and tell stories. I love the art of photography and how a single image tells many stories. My driving objective is not only to achieve my creative goals and full potentials but to hopefully serve and inspire others who are equally on the same quest as I. Connect with me on social media. I would love to hear from you.

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